The Day I Got the Wog?!

The Day I Got the Wog

Before we take offence, let us recall that the usage of colloquial and slang words changes over time.  In ‘Ozzieland’ (Australia) back in the day, when this little poem from my childhood was written, the word “wog” had at least two popular connotations.  It was used to refer to certain ethnic groups of people.  This was mainly Italians, but it, for example, was also applied to Greeks and Croatians.  Sadly, at times, this usage was a derisive and aggressive means of address.  We would say that is racist.

There is some information on the use of the term “wog” on google, if you have the time and inclination to search. 

The other connotation of the word “wog” referred to times when we had a cold or flu (influenza).  I am not sure if it applies to “man flu”.  We might have said in former times: “Sorry mate, I can’t play footy on the weekend, coz I’ve got the bloody flu!”  The poem I wrote back in about 1983 is about the experience I had of the flu. I would have been about 11 or 12 years old.

Given this latest southern hemisphere winter has been a severe one for colds and flu I thought it timely to extract this silly little rhyme from the archives.  I hope it does not sicken any readers! 🙂

The Day I Got the Wog

The day I got the wog,

I got so very hot,

My eyes thought they were on fire,

Not to mention the rest of the rot.

And when I got into my bed,

I sweated something rotten,

For when I went to get out,

I found I was stuck to the cotton!

I shivered and shook like jelly,

And boy, how sick was my belly.

Simon C.J. Falk  circa 1983.

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